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The response to treatment varies from individual to individual, and depends upon ones healing ability. Some people experience localized swelling, inflammation and pain around the injection site that resolves over the following few days. Others experience no discomfort. Some people may only need a few treatments while others may need 10 or more. A typical course of therapy is six to ten treatments, sometimes with multiple injections during each treatment. Treatment is usually repeated every four to six weeks.

Injections of irritant solutions were performed in the late 1800’s to repair hernias and in the early 1900’s for jaw pain due to TMJ (jaw) joint laxity. George Hackett, MD developed the technique of prolotherapy in the 1940’s. Dr. Gustav Hemwall was a pioneer in prolotherapy, beginning his studies and treatments in the 1950’s and continuing until the mid 1990s. In his study of almost 10,000 prolotherapy cases, Dr. Hackett found that over 99 percent of the patients found relief from their chronic pain.

Recent advancements in prolotherapy by doctors of oriental medicine, certified for expanded practice in New Mexico, have improved outcomes. The addition of pharmaceutical grade vitamins, minerals, homeopathic medicines, and natural medicines to the Prolotherapy injection solution improves the regeneration of the ligaments, tendons and cartilage. Sometimes ozone is used for prolotherapy which helps eliminate chronic localized pathogens that can contribute to joint instability, dysfunction and pain. Often the dextrose is unnecessary. This is a real advantage for sensitive people who are more prone to inflammation and pain. It also makes Prolotherapy possible for those with hardware (screws, rods, joint replacements, etc.) near the injection site since the presence of such hardware is a contraindication for conventional Prolotherapy using an irritant like dextrose.

Prolotherapy can be helpful for:

Musculoskeletal pain

Arthritis

Back pain

Sacroiliac sprain

Sciatica

Neck pain

Fibromyalgia

Sports injuries

Knee injuries and pain

Shoulder injuries and pain

Rotator cuff tears or syndrome

Elbow injuries and pain

Tennis or golfers elbow

Tendonitis

Ankle injuries and pain

Whiplash

Carpal tunnel syndrome

Chronic tendonitis

Partially torn tendons

Ligaments and cartilage

Degenerative disk disease

Herniated discs

TMJ

Sciatica

Cartilage injury

Cluster headache

Migraine headache

Headache

Heel spurs

Hip Degeneration

PolioNeural Therapy involves the injection of procaine (also known by its trademark name Novocain), a common local anesthetic, into various but very specific areas to reduce pain and improve health. Local anesthetics are drugs that normally cause numbness or reduce pain. The practice of neural therapy is based on the understanding that energy flows freely throughout the body of a healthy person. Injury, trauma, disease, infection, poor nutrition, stress, and even scar tissue disrupt this flow, produce longstanding disturbances in the electrochemical function of tissues and create energy imbalances called “interference fields.”

Neural Therapy injections are administered to eliminate the interference and restore the bodys natural energy flow. The injections may be administered subcutaneously (just below the skin) in specified patterns, into nerves, acupuncture points, glands, scars, and trigger points. Deep injections are sometimes administered into an autonomic nerve ganglia (a cluster of nervous tissue) or plexus (a network of nerves). Key points that may be far from the pain source may be used. The goal of neural therapy is to correct the interference and heal the illness or symptom.

When optimally performed, if an interference field is injected with a local anesthetic a “flash phenomenon” or “Huneke phenomenon” occurs. An immediate change in the symptoms is the result. While the concept of the flash phenomenon is what defines the method, in practice it is the use of local anesthetics, preferably but not exclusively procaine. Procaine can optimize the bioelectric charge across cell walls and this improves movement of nutrients into the cell and waste products out.

Neural Therapy should not be confused with the nerve blocks and local anesthesia used in conventional medicine. Nerve blocks involve injections of medication to relieve pain caused by stimulation of a peripheral nerve. Local anesthesia is medication given at a local site to relieve localized pain. For example, a local anesthetic may be given before a tooth is removed or before removing a small skin lesion.

Generally, response to treatment varies for each individual but can be dramatic with sudden improvement of long lasting ailments, accompanied by autonomous reactions such as sweating and at times an emotional release such as compulsory laughter or weeping.

Neural Therapy was originally developed by Ferdinand Huneke, a German surgeon during the first half of the twentieth century.Trigger Point Therapy involves the injection of procaine (a local anesthetic) into trigger points, with the intention of causing a twitch response, to help relieve pain and tension in muscles. Trigger points are hyperirritable spots in skeletal muscle that are associated with palpable nodules in taut bands of muscle fibers. The palpable nodules are small contraction knots and a common cause of pain. Compression of a trigger point may elicit local tenderness, referred pain, or motor dysfunction.

Janet G. Travell, M.D., was responsible for the most detailed and important work on Trigger Point Therapy and her text books define the practice. Her work treating US President John F. Kennedy’s back pain was so successful that she was asked to be the first female Personal Physician to the President.

The main innovation of Dr. Travells work was the introduction of the concept of myofascial pain syndrome. Myofascial refers to the combination of muscle and fascia. Fascia is the thin layer of connective tissue covering, supporting, or connecting the muscles or inner organs of the body. Myofascial pain syndrome is described as a focal hyperirritability in muscle that can strongly modulate central nervous system functions. It is distinguished from fibromyalgia, which is characterized by widespread pain and tenderness and is described as a central increase of perception of pain (nociception), giving rise to deep tissue tenderness that includes muscles. Studies estimate that in 75 to 95 per cent of cases, myofascial pain is a primary cause of regional pain. Myofascial pain is associated with muscle tenderness that arises from trigger points. Trigger points are focal points of tenderness, a few millimeters in diameter, found at multiple sites in a muscle and the fascia of muscle tissue. Biopsy tests found that trigger points were hyperirritable and electrically active muscle spindles in general muscle tissue.

Dr. Travell discovered that trigger points have a number of qualities. They may be classified as active or latent, key or satellite and primary or secondary. An active trigger point is one that actively refers pain either locally or to another location. Most trigger points refer pain elsewhere in the body along nerve pathways. A latent trigger point is one that exists, but does not yet refer pain actively, but may do so when pressure or strain is applied to the myofascial structure containing the trigger point. A key trigger point is one that has a pain referral pattern along a nerve pathway that activates a latent trigger point on the pathway, or creates it. A satellite trigger point is one which is activated by a key trigger point. Successfully treating the key trigger point often will resolve the satellite trigger point and change it from being active to latent, or completely resolving it. In contrast, a primary trigger point in many cases will biomechanically activate a secondary trigger point in another structure. Treating the primary trigger point does not treat the secondary trigger point.

The following factors may cause or activate trigger points: acute or chronic muscle overload, activation by other trigger points (key/satellite, primary/secondary), disease, infection, radiculopathy (any disease of a nerve root), direct trauma to the region, homeostatic imbalances, psycho-emotional disorders and unhealthy lifestyle choices.

Trigger points can result when muscular overload causes a prolonged release of Ca2+ ion (calcium) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (storage unit for the muscle cell) which results in a sticking of the untrained or overloaded cells. This leads to a compression of capillaries (tiny blood vessels) and results in an increased local energy demand and local ischemia (loss of blood circulation) to the area. This “energy crisis” causes the release of chemicals that augment pain activity. Since an involved muscle is weakened by this sustained shortening, surrounding muscles themselves may develop trigger points in a compensatory fashion.

Trigger points can appear in many myofascial structures including muscles, tendons, ligaments, skin, joint capsules, periosteum (membrane that covers the bones) and scar tissue. When present in muscles there is often pain and weakness in the associated structures. These pain patterns in muscles follow specific nerve pathways or zones of referred pain and have been mapped for identification of the causative pain factor. Many trigger points have pain patterns that overlap, and some create reciprocal cyclic relationships that need to be treated extensively to remove them.

Trigger points are diagnosed by examining signs, symptoms, pain patterns and by manual palpation. Usually there is a taut band in muscles containing trigger points, and a hard nodule can be felt. Pressing on an affected muscle can often refer pain. Clusters of trigger points are not uncommon in some of the larger muscles. Often a twitch response can be felt in the muscle by running your finger perpendicular to the muscles direction. This twitch response often activates the “all or nothing” response in a muscle that causes it to immediately contract followed by relaxation.

Traditionally, Trigger Point Therapy involved injecting procaine into the trigger points with the intention to elicit a twitch response to resolve the trigger point. Also, procaine can optimize the bioelectric charge across cell walls and this improves movement of nutrients into the cell and waste products out. Treating trigger points may also be accomplished by injecting other substances (saline, lidocaine) into the trigger point, inserting a needle into the trigger point without injecting anything (dry-needling), deep massage (myofascial release) and by spray and stretch techniques in which a topical refrigerant is sprayed to temporarily numb the skin surface at a specific area, after which the muscles of the area are methodically stretched.Trigger Point Therapy involves the injection of procaine (a local anesthetic) into trigger points, with the intention of causing a twitch response, to help relieve pain and tension in muscles. Trigger points are hyperirritable spots in skeletal muscle that are associated with palpable nodules in taut bands of muscle fibers. The palpable nodules are small contraction knots and a common cause of pain. Compression of a trigger point may elicit local tenderness, referred pain, or motor dysfunction.

Janet G. Travell, M.D., was responsible for the most detailed and important work on Trigger Point Therapy and her text books define the practice. Her work treating US President John F. Kennedy’s back pain was so successful that she was asked to be the first female Personal Physician to the President.

The main innovation of Dr. Travells work was the introduction of the concept of myofascial pain syndrome. Myofascial refers to the combination of muscle and fascia. Fascia is the thin layer of connective tissue covering, supporting, or connecting the muscles or inner organs of the body. Myofascial pain syndrome is described as a focal hyperirritability in muscle that can strongly modulate central nervous system functions. It is distinguished from fibromyalgia, which is characterized by widespread pain and tenderness and is described as a central increase of perception of pain (nociception), giving rise to deep tissue tenderness that includes muscles. Studies estimate that in 75 to 95 per cent of cases, myofascial pain is a primary cause of regional pain. Myofascial pain is associated with muscle tenderness that arises from trigger points. Trigger points are focal points of tenderness, a few millimeters in diameter, found at multiple sites in a muscle and the fascia of muscle tissue. Biopsy tests found that trigger points were hyperirritable and electrically active muscle spindles in general muscle tissue.

Dr. Travell discovered that trigger points have a number of qualities. They may be classified as active or latent, key or satellite and primary or secondary. An active trigger point is one that actively refers pain either locally or to another location. Most trigger points refer pain elsewhere in the body along nerve pathways. A latent trigger point is one that exists, but does not yet refer pain actively, but may do so when pressure or strain is applied to the myofascial structure containing the trigger point. A key trigger point is one that has a pain referral pattern along a nerve pathway that activates a latent trigger point on the pathway, or creates it. A satellite trigger point is one which is activated by a key trigger point. Successfully treating the key trigger point often will resolve the satellite trigger point and change it from being active to latent, or completely resolving it. In contrast, a primary trigger point in many cases will biomechanically activate a secondary trigger point in another structure. Treating the primary trigger point does not treat the secondary trigger point.

The following factors may cause or activate trigger points: acute or chronic muscle overload, activation by other trigger points (key/satellite, primary/secondary), disease, infection, radiculopathy (any disease of a nerve root), direct trauma to the region, homeostatic imbalances, psycho-emotional disorders and unhealthy lifestyle choices.

Trigger points can result when muscular overload causes a prolonged release of Ca2+ ion (calcium) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (storage unit for the muscle cell) which results in a sticking of the untrained or overloaded cells. This leads to a compression of capillaries (tiny blood vessels) and results in an increased local energy demand and local ischemia (loss of blood circulation) to the area. This “energy crisis” causes the release of chemicals that augment pain activity. Since an involved muscle is weakened by this sustained shortening, surrounding muscles themselves may develop trigger points in a compensatory fashion.

Trigger points can appear in many myofascial structures including muscles, tendons, ligaments, skin, joint capsules, periosteum (membrane that covers the bones) and scar tissue. When present in muscles there is often pain and weakness in the associated structures. These pain patterns in muscles follow specific nerve pathways or zones of referred pain and have been mapped for identification of the causative pain factor. Many trigger points have pain patterns that overlap, and some create reciprocal cyclic relationships that need to be treated extensively to remove them.

Trigger points are diagnosed by examining signs, symptoms, pain patterns and by manual palpation. Usually there is a taut band in muscles containing trigger points, and a hard nodule can be felt. Pressing on an affected muscle can often refer pain. Clusters of trigger points are not uncommon in some of the larger muscles. Often a twitch response can be felt in the muscle by running your finger perpendicular to the muscles direction. This twitch response often activates the “all or nothing” response in a muscle that causes it to immediately contract followed by relaxation.

Traditionally, Trigger Point Therapy involved injecting procaine into the trigger points with the intention to elicit a twitch response to resolve the trigger point. Also, procaine can optimize the bioelectric charge across cell walls and this improves movement of nutrients into the cell and waste products out. Treating trigger points may also be accomplished by injecting other substances (saline, lidocaine) into the trigger point, inserting a needle into the trigger point without injecting anything (dry-needling), deep massage (myofascial release) and by spray and stretch techniques in which a topical refrigerant is sprayed to temporarily numb the skin surface at a specific area, after which the muscles of the area are methodically stretched.Mesotherapy is a non-surgical, cosmetic procedure. Mesotherapy employs multiple injections of pharmaceutical and homeopathic medications, plant extracts, vitamins, and other ingredients into the subcutaneous fat. Mesotherapy injections target adipose fat cells, apparently by inducing rupture and cell death among fat cells, thereby reducing cellulite and fat. It is called mesotherapy because the injections go under the skin and are absorbed by the mesodermal (middle) layer of skin.

Homeopathic Medicine involves prescribing for a patient with symptoms of an illness, extremely small doses of the substances that produce the same symptoms in healthy people when exposed to larger quantities. A homeopathic medicine is prepared by diluting the substance in a series of steps. The homeopathic remedy will retain a “memory” of the diluted substance and the therapeutic potency of a remedy can be increased by serial dilution combined with succussion, or vigorous shaking. Many homeopathic medicines are so highly diluted that no molecules of the original substance remain after dilution. Even so, homeopathic remedies have proven to be effective for a very wide range of health problems.